Posts tagged businesses
FullStack's First Client Satisfaction Survey
 

FullStack, like many other start-ups, wants to make sure client satisfaction is at an all-time high for existing clients. Therefore, part of our strategic plan included developing a quick survey to send to them annually, here in September.

The good news was that we had 70% participation, which is actually pretty good for super-busy business owners and operators. The super good news is that we have an overall Net Promoter Score of 86% (we were aiming for over 80 for the first survey), with operational areas scoring in the 80’s and 90’s. There’s always places in which we can improve, especially in our first year, so even though we’re perfectionists, we are happy with this constructive feedback and look forward to improving.

The best outcome is that we had some REAL feedback that we have already begun taking to heart, with items we could take action on straightaway. One thing we’ve heard the most is asking for additional services to help our client owners learn about HR and collaborate, so this week, we sent our Slack channel invites to FullStack’s client leaders. We’ve already had some use of the page for private messages and questions, so we’re looking forward to continuing that and letting it grow organically among our client leaders.

It’s all part of our greater mission to help businesses emerge and thrive - You have to have connection in order to leverage knowledge in our business communities, and you have to be willing to communicate with one another to help one another succeed. We’re happy to be helping our clients do so and hope these connections will help them exponentially as they grow and evolve.


 
What #metoo Should Mean for Businesses

Between recent pressure on the film and entertainment industry, as well as the heinous crimes and cover-ups in the world of gymnastics, businesses should take current events as a wake-up call to review both current policy and practice. Here is a starting point of considerations for any business:

  • Does your company have an anti-harassment policy?

  • Is the policy written at a level that all employees in your workplace can comprehend?

  • Is it in the correct language(s) for all employees to comprehend?

  • If you have a policy, are your employees aware of it?

  • Is it in the company handbook, and if so, is the handbook acknowledged in writing?

  • Is there any type of orientation or training upon hire?

  • Is there regular (i.e. annual) refreshment training?

If you can say with certainty that all of the bullet points above are checked, you’ve got a great lead on many other businesses. But here are some additional points that businesses must ask themselves, and be forthcoming about the answers:

  • Does your culture support open communication?

  • Does your culture support a harassment-free work environment?

  • Does your business pay women and men equally for the same position with same experience?

  • Do your employees believe they can take any issue to management and have it addressed fully? Without retaliation towards them by peers or managers?

  • Has an employee ever raised a concern? About harassment or another work condition?

  • If so, how was it addressed?

So many businesses stop at the former list of bullet points; when, in reality, the latter reveals your true culture, and thereby, whether or not your workplace may have #metoo issues. Business owners must take a hard look at all points, working alongside HR, to have the minimum expectations addressed, with the culture of support to ensure the environment isn’t just tolerable for all, but ideal for all.